fbpx
This is how much more a typical Christmas dinner will cost this year compared to last, The Manc

This is how much more a typical Christmas dinner will cost this year compared to last

Newly-compiled data has revealed how much more a typical Christmas dinner will cost on average this year compared to last.

The average prices for turkey, Christmas pudding, Brussels Sprouts, and gravy granules have risen in 2021 according to data compiled by Kantar – which showed that the average price of a typical festive meal for four was about 89p higher than in 2020, Sky News reports.

It comes after grocery inflation rose by 3.2% in the first four weeks of November.

Although the prices of some festive dinner favourites have risen this year, costs are down on other items such as parsnips, cranberry sauce, and carrots.

ADVERTISEMENT

The average cost of a Christmas dinner in 2021 is £27.48.

This is how much more a typical Christmas dinner will cost this year compared to last, The Manc
The average cost of a Christmas dinner in 2021 is £27.48. / Credit: Kantar

Overall, Kantar’s analysis of the prices of Christmas dinner favourites showed the cost of frozen turkey was up 7% at £12.46, and Christmas pudding up 5% at £2.48, while Brussels sprouts rose 5% to 92p, cauliflower added 5% to 90p, and gravy granules rose 3% to £1.39.

Sparkling wine was unchanged at £6.47, while cranberry sauce is down 3% at 90p, potatoes are down 5% to £1.10, and carrots are 13% lower at 41p.

ADVERTISEMENT

After revealing that the overall grocery inflation rate climbed to 3.2% in the four weeks to 28 November – which is the highest level since June last year – Kantar also said that prices are rising fastest for savoury snacks, crisps and cat food.

Prices have however fallen for items such as fresh bacon, bath and shower products and pet treats too.

This is how much more a typical Christmas dinner will cost this year compared to last, The Manc
It comes after grocery inflation rose by 3.2% in the first four weeks of November / Credit: Unsplash (Kraken Images)

Fraser McKevitt – Head of Retail and Consumer Insight at Kantar – explained that price inflation did not seem to be denting shoppers’ appetites to treat themselves however, as supermarket premium own-label ranges appeared to be the fastest-growing in stores.

“Habits we’d expect to see shift, like swapping branded products for own label or seeking out promotions, haven’t altered just yet,” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

The figures also showed that, for the 12 weeks to 28 November, grocery sales fell by 3.8%.

This was compared with the same period last year, which was a time when the COVID-19 pandemic meant that consumers bought more food and drink to eat at home as fewer were choosing not to, or were unable to eat out.

Featured Image – Pixabay (Lesley Negus)

Total
18
Shares
Related Posts